Wednesday, May 30 2018
18:00 - 19:30
Meeting point : Maxwell-Cummings Auditorium – 1379A Sherbrooke Street West
Duration : 1h 30
In English
Lectures, In connection with : From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present
Exhibiting Africa, Then and Now

Shelley Ruth Butler, anthropologist and author of Contested Representations: Revisiting Into The Heart of Africa, and Dominique Fontaine, independent curator and founder of aPOSteRIORi

How can museums address difficult histories? How does contemporary art disrupt colonial stereotypes and evoke cosmopolitan identities? Join independent curator Dominique Fontaine and anthropologist Shelley Ruth Butler as they discuss museological issues and the role of contemporary African art in the exhibition From Africa to the Americas: Face to Face Picasso, Past and Present.

Activity free of charge. Optional pass reservation: in order to guarantee admission to the lectures, you may reserve a numbered seat in exchange for a service charge. One hour before the event, passes for any remaining seats will be given out free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis.

Service charges (per pass)
General public: $5
VIP: $4

Wednesday, June 6 2018
18:00 - 19:30
Meeting point : Maxwell-Cummings Auditorium – 1379A Sherbrooke Street West
Duration : 1h 30
In French
Lectures, In connection with : From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present
Le concept de « paysage intérieur » : les plaisirs de l’appropriation et Picasso bercé dans un Paris noir

James Oscar, author, critic and cultural anthropologist 

As rare as they may be, certain great artists have been able to rise above the mere voyeurism of cultural appropriation in their art. Could there be a certain ground zero in artistic practice? Are there artists who penetrate this distance and scale the walls separating them from the Other, transcending voyeurism to attain the interior landscapes of other cultures and ideas? One might think of Artaud in Mexico or Victor Segalen in China. Quoting the writer Claudia Rankine, I would ask how artists can “imaginatively inhabit the other” and “embody and examine the interior landscape that wishes to speak of rights, that wishes to move freely and without constraint across time, space and the lines of power.” Was Picasso such an artist, “imaginatively inhabiting the other” and “embodying and examining interior landscapes”? In this lecture, we will look at a “translucent” Picasso, for whom art forms were acts of both transmission and creation; explore the “journey” across artistic practice: the artist as “medium,” as vessel, as trickster moving in and out  of interior landscapes; and discover the Picasso nestled within the very exhilarating Black Paris of the 1920s and ’30s. 

Activity free of charge. Optional pass reservation: in order to guarantee admission to the lectures, you may reserve a numbered seat in exchange for a service charge. One hour before the event, passes for any remaining seats will be given out free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis.

Service charges (per pass)
General public: $5
VIP: $4

Wednesday, June 20 2018
18:00 - 19:30
Meeting point : Maxwell-Cummings Auditorium – 1379A Sherbrooke Street West
Duration : 1h 30
In French
Lectures, In connection with : From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present
L’abstraction dans l’art historique de l’Afrique subsaharienne

Constantine Petridis,  chair of the Department of the Arts of Africa and the Americas and curator of African art, Art Institute of Chicago

When considering the traditional or historical arts of sub-Saharan Africa, one notices a predilection for abstraction in the rendering of the human form that departs from nature. It is this particular characteristic that appears to have drawn Picasso and other members of the European artistic avant-garde to look at African art as a source of inspiration and innovation. Scholars of African art have attempted to understand the reasons behind these abstract preferences in Africa south of the Sahara. Some have proposed a relationship between art and landscape, others have emphasized the conceptual or ideological nature of most art in Africa. What is certain, however, is that meanings and qualities Picasso and his colleagues came to recognize and value in the works they first encountered in Paris in the early years of the twentieth century, rarely coincided with how artists, patrons and audiences had understood and experienced these same works in their original settings in Africa.

Activity free of charge. Optional pass reservation: in order to guarantee admission to the lectures, you may reserve a numbered seat in exchange for a service charge. One hour before the event, passes for any remaining seats will be given out free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis.

Service charges (per pass)
General public: $5
VIP: $4

Tuesday, September 25 2018
17:30 - 19:00
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
FRANÇOIS FILIATRAULT – USAGE ET SYMBOLIQUE DES INSTRUMENTS CHEZ BACH

All About Bach Cantatas

In Bach’s day, each instrument signified a particular element or domain through various associations related to its sound, its construction, its form, or its origins. In his cantatas, the great Cantor of Leipzig made extensive use of this symbolic dimension, to more forcefully express the theological message of the texts.

François Filiatrault, lecturer

Friday, October 19 2018
17:30 - 19:00
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
SYLVAIN CARON – FRANÇOIS COUPERIN ET L’ART DU TABLEAU MUSICAL

Couperin Days

Couperin knew how to set to music the stylistic traits of his contemporaries, such as the painter Watteau, and the themes that were dear to them: festive gatherings, nature, love, and other passions of the soul. Discover his distinct talent in “painting” these characteristics.

Sylvain Caron, lecturer
Luc Beauséjour, harpsichord

Saturday, October 20 2018
16:00 - 17:00
Duration : 1h
Lectures
ENTRETIEN AVEC CHRISTOPHE ROUSSET – ANIMÉ PAR NATALIE MICHAUD

Couperin Days – Interview with Christophe Rousset

A fervent performer of the music of François Couperin, Christophe Rousset shares his reflections on the works of this great French composer for whom the year 2018 marks the 350th anniversary of birth.

Hosted by Natalie Michaud (in French)

Tuesday, October 23 2018
17:30 - 19:00
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
EDWARD HIGGINBOTTOM – LES MOTETS DE FRANÇOIS COUPERIN, OU L’ART DE RETOUCHER LES OUTRAGES DU TEMPS

Couperin Days

François Couperin, nicknamed “the Great,” is known especially for his works for harpsichord. His vocal music, however, and his sacred vocal music in particular, is equally as impressive. Although his great motets have been lost, several of his petits motets still remain, as does his exquisite Leçons de ténèbres. Edward Higginbottom explains his reconstruction of motets written for the Sun King and the Royal Chapel, which survived only partially.

Edward Higginbottom, lecturer

Saturday, November 10 2018
14:00 - 15:30
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
DUJKA SMOJE – LES ANGES MUSICIENS (13th – 16th CENTURY

In Connection with the Exhibition Resplendent Illuminations

Musician, messenger from another world, guardian of souls: the angel, alone or in a choir, plays a variety of instruments that accompany a celestial celebration. The angels inhabit illuminated manuscripts, in gold and azure colours, attendant on the scores of their human contemporaries. Dufay, Binchois, and Ockeghem were the most inspired among the latter; no doubt were they also the  favourites of the angels…

Dujka Smoje, lecturer

Wednesday, November 28 2018
17:30 - 19:00
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
GILLES CANTAGREL – CANTATE, QUE ME VEUX-TU ?

All About Bach Cantatas

Often overlooked until about half a century ago, Bach’s cantatas have since been re-established in their broad appeal. But when, how, and where were they performed during the Baroque period? What was their purpose? What do their texts have to say? A whole world to discover!

Gilles Cantagrel, lecturer

Saturday, February 2 2019
14:00 - 15:30
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
NICOLAS BOULERICE – TURLUTAGE, PIERRE ANGULAIRE DE LA TRANSMISSION ORALE

In Conncertion with the Concert by Le Vent du Nord

The turlutte is a form of musical expression specific to Quebec folklore that consists of singing onomatopoeia on the tunes of traditional songs. From its Italian origins to the inventiveness of La Bolduc, from the straightforward imitation of reels to virtuosic vocal agility, rediscover this homegrown musical idiom.

Nicolas Boulerice, lecturer

Saturday, March 9 2019
14:00 - 15:30
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
ALEXANDRE DRATWICKI- VOIR LA MUSIQUE : LA MISE EN SCÈNE D’OPÉRA FRANÇAIS À L’ÉPOQUE ROMANTIQUE

Festival Plazzetto Bru Zane Montreal

While opera is known primarily to be a vocal genre centred around the technical prowess of its singers, in France during the Romantic period, opera evolved to become an integrated work of art in which dance, sets, costumes, and staging were considered to be equally as important as its musical component. Discover the complexity of a genre that aspired to be as historical, moral, and political as it was artistic.

Alexandre Dratwicki, lecturer

Wednesday, March 27 2019
17:30 - 19:00
Duration : 1h 30
Lectures
GEORGES LEROUX – LES CANTATES DE BACH ET LA COMMUNAUTÉ : LE RÔLE DES CHORALS

All About Bach Cantatas

Bach’s cantatas served a dual purpose: on the one hand, each cantata was integrated into the liturgical cycle; on the other, they contributed to the pious edification of the community. Bach conferred on his chorales the task of aligning these two aims, which explains their musical and spiritual richness.

Georges Leroux, lecturer