Skip to contentSkip to navigation
Become a Member
Explore today's schedule
Visit MMFA for free by becoming a Member
Learn more

EducExpo

The Fairy Tale Fresco

Credit

Launched by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Montreal Hooked on School program, this project gave twelve elementary school classes on the Island of Montreal the chance to explore oral traditions and storytelling.

By discovering works from the Museum’s different collections, the students learned about the importance of storytelling as a foundation of culture. With storytellers Gotta Lago, Nadine Walsh and Paul Mystère Bradley, the students explored orality and interpretation using fairy tales and legends. Then, with illustrator Alain Reno, the students translated these tales into the images that inspired them. Finally, the fairy tales were retold as the children reimagined them, which got the groups thinking about how everyone contributes to the infinite variations of stories that make up our lives.

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM, Carol Levasseur’s class, Group 61, inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago. Leslie Calero Artiles, Simon Comeau, Rana Debouk, Asma Djemili, Léona Dugas-Paquet, Parlo Wesle Fils, Anais Hedjal, Mouayade Kaouani, William Lapierre-Tanguay, Charlie Lavigne, Baoyi Liu, Khoudir Mansour, Marina Marinova, Kheir Eddine Mekadem, Ilyass Nouri, Samuel Jose Rodriguez Franco, Sara Saou, Sina Sharifi, Ilyas Tiaouinine, Thomas Veeraragoo.

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM

Inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago

Carol Levasseur’s class
Hugo Braën’s class
Laurence Brisson-Grenier’s class
Isabelle Chouinard’s class
Discover the tale

The Legend of the Bridges

by Gotta Lago

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM, Carol Levasseur’s class, Group 61, inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago. Leslie Calero Artiles, Simon Comeau, Rana Debouk, Asma Djemili, Léona Dugas-Paquet, Parlo Wesle Fils, Anais Hedjal, Mouayade Kaouani, William Lapierre-Tanguay, Charlie Lavigne, Baoyi Liu, Khoudir Mansour, Marina Marinova, Kheir Eddine Mekadem, Ilyass Nouri, Samuel Jose Rodriguez Franco, Sara Saou, Sina Sharifi, Ilyas Tiaouinine, Thomas Veeraragoo.

Watch the video

It is the year 7027. Human beings have evolved into a Primitive Future, when advanced technologies are based on ancestral values and knowledge. In the universe, far beyond the sky are the planets and constellations: the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn. A festival is held each day of the first week of the month. Monday on the moon, Tuesday on Mars, Wednesday on Mercury, Thursday on Jupiter, Friday on Venus, Saturday on Saturn. What about Sunday? Let’s listen to the rest of the story to find out. Frustrated at not having a festival to celebrate, the inhabitants of Dramoss got angry and decided to go on a very long journey.

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM, Hugo Braën’s class, Group 52, inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago. Rayane Ameur, Assena Achille Jessé Attoumoh, Ziad Beggas, Wumba Nsa Bila, Noor Dandachli, Sophie De Koning, Anaïs Marie Mbissine Dieng, Jude Olivier Edmond, Ghali Ennaji Ait Hmitti, Nadine Hernane, Eva-Madeleine Karmazenuk, Fey Lévesque Tremblay, Isaura Maheu-Gonthier, Ines Messaoudi, Lou Minty, Cynthia Musokayi, Hubert Paquet, Mathilda Pilco Hall, Mégane Rioux, Gabriel Rouleau, Thomas Jefferson Saint-Fleur, Léopold Sigwald, Olivier Vinette.

After travelling a long distance of eight light years, one night during a full moon, a huge flying saucer landed on the surface of the earth. A tremendous explosion could be heard from everywhere: BOOM! Inside were creatures that could take any form. Were they mutants with supernatural powers? Imagine for yourself!

At that time, the earth was shapeless, empty, smooth as the surface of water and uninhabited. The north was empty. The south was empty. The east was empty. The west was empty. Was the middle empty? No! There were mutants who went on to become the first human beings. To stave off boredom, they invented music with their whole bodies that they would sing to. They called this music “body beats,” which they made through spontaneous movements along with singing or onomatopoeia. Later, the earthlings discovered the forest and its animal inhabitants. From that day on, humans and animals shared the same city and invented the musical instruments that they still use today.

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM, Laurence Brisson-Grenier’s class, Group 51, inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago, Mathieu Alves De Sousa, Nour Beggas, Mailys Bouslah, Thomas D. Blais, Mohamed Debouk, Louis Desjardins, Camille Di Stefano, Mathis Doucet, Félix Fonfrède, Alicia Forgues, Océane, Foucault, Gilda Ghassemi Nedjad, Odile Maltais de Lalonde, Rayane Messous, Béatrice Neault, Jeremy Nguyen, Lina Nouri, Yasmine Rabti, Maya Smaili, Kellyanne Solibello-Gravel, Nicolas Wroblewska-Lantin, Mariem Zaroui.

This era lasted a long time. The Earth then became a single, harmonious city. And the continents? There weren’t any. It’s true! Life was so wonderful and peaceful that all of the inhabitants—despite their different colours, sizes and shapes—were very similar to each other. No one was aware of the scourges of discrimination, racism or xenophobia.

However, even though the tongue and the teeth live together, the teeth can still bite the tongue. After a great dispute of unknown origin, the great and beautiful city was divided in two. One side was ruled by a fearsome queen and the other by a fierce sultan.

Saint-François-Solano Elementary School - CSSDM, Isabelle Chouinard’s class, Group 61, inspired by the tale The Legend of the Bridges by Gotta Lago. Gabriel Francisco Almonte Saldana, Assirem Belarbi, Jireh Carcamo-Gonzalez, Itza Nola Côté, Iris Desroches, Louis Dumont, Anas El Yazidi, Théodore Grenon, Rayan Habtiche, Salah-Eddine Hanouz, Dalie Laborde, Léo Lacasse, Clara Marchand-Gagnon, Zacharie Maz, Lauren Mazon Padron, Clara Milot, Marie-Anne, Pepin, Fay Petiote Latour, Charlie Platel, Chris Wagnol Renaudin, Augustine Risler, Liam Rodrigue, Sophie Tamiozzo Nadeau, Elie Villeneuve

For centuries, the two cities did not have contact with each other and were separated by a large river called the “River of Curses” because it was infested with hippos, piranhas and terrible alligators. Anyone who ventured there to swim, bathe or fish would disappear forever.

One day, the fierce Sultan of the South summoned the labourer Wakiza (an Indigenous name meaning “determined warrior”). He asked him for a great favour: to build a huge concrete wall to separate his city from that of the Queen of the North. In exchange, he offered him a mountain of gold and a plot of land so that he could settle in his part of the city with his family. The passing wind took the news to the Queen of the North, who made the same offer to Wakiza: build a concrete wall so that she could neither see nor hear the inhabitants of the other city. She doubled his compensation.

After hearing these proposals, Wakiza the labourer returned home to the forest completely unsure as to what to do. After thinking over the problem for three days, he called upon all the Djinns and spirits of the forest. Instead of concrete walls, they helped him build a huge bridge that united the two fighting cities. The work was completed in just one night. When the families and children of the two cities awoke the next day, they discovered a magnificent bridge and brought out their drums and instruments to celebrate this wonderful reconciliation. The griots of the two cities sang praises for the newfound peace. The rulers called for Wakiza, congratulated him on his achievement, and honoured their commitments with bags of gold and plots of land. With his legendary humility, he said, “I would like to stay and live among you, but I cannot as I still have many bridges to build around the world.” And with that, Wakiza went on his way.

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB, Véronique Capistran and Sarah Beaulieu’s class, Groups 591-691, inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh. Axelle Dépatie, Simone Pineault, Marianne Gauvreau, Véronique Proulx, Yaïra Gallardo, Arnaud Bergeron, Thomas St-Jean, Marilou Sévigny, Zackary Vincent, Victor Américi, Damien Valcourt, Tomas Mateo Prénoveau-Moya, Florence Lapierre, Zoynab Ali, Jade Fortier Favron, William Donald Pétrie, Orélie Constant, Naomie Grenier, Slyler Lachance-Anderson, Edouard Sheewood Guensley Pierre, Delphine Roy, Frédérique Vincent, Arthur Bazinet, Lucas Gelderblom.

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB

Inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh

Véronique Capistran and Sarah Beaulieu’s class
Thierry Marie-Lessard’s class
Nicola Ferro’s class
Annie Thibodeau’s class
Discover the tale

The Troll With No Heart in His Body

By Nadine Walsh

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB, Véronique Capistran and Sarah Beaulieu’s class, Groups 591-691, inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh. Axelle Dépatie, Simone Pineault, Marianne Gauvreau, Véronique Proulx, Yaïra Gallardo, Arnaud Bergeron, Thomas St-Jean, Marilou Sévigny, Zackary Vincent, Victor Américi, Damien Valcourt, Tomas Mateo Prénoveau-Moya, Florence Lapierre, Zoynab Ali, Jade Fortier Favron, William Donald Pétrie, Orélie Constant, Naomie Grenier, Slyler Lachance-Anderson, Edouard Sheewood Guensley Pierre, Delphine Roy, Frédérique Vincent, Arthur Bazinet, Lucas Gelderblom.

Watch the video

Once upon a time there was a king who had seven sons, whom he loved very much. When his sons grew up, the king told them to go out into the world and find princesses to marry. However, he kept his youngest son with him so he wouldn’t be alone.

— But you must bring him back a princess! he told his other sons.

After procuring the most majestic horses, the most elegant clothes, and the most finely crafted swords, the six princes went off to see the world. Each one met a princess who wanted to be with them, but none gave even a thought about finding a princess for their youngest brother.

On the way back home, they all passed by a high, steep mountain. It was a troll’s house. When the troll spied the princes and princesses, he turned them all into stone.

At the castle, the king waited for a year for his sons to return. The wait became unbearable. The youngest son therefore decided to go find his brothers.

— I will return, he said to his father.

The king tried to get him to stay, but to no avail. Only one old work horse was left in the king’s stables. The prince bridled it and left.

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB, Thierry Marie-Lessard’s class, Group 501, inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh. Victor Baker, Julien Blein, Victoria Boudreault, Laiba Choudhury, Antoine De Bruyn, Alice Dufresne, Noé Dumas, Bastien Fortier, Olivia Gauchier, Léon Jacques, Juliette Jeandot, Zoë Lapaix-Beaupré, Rafaël Lenoir Martin, Hayden Lépine, Danaé Levasseur-Lizotte, Atshennonnia Meunier, Maribel Molina, Maximo Mussuto Molinas, Enia-Maria Mutu, Léa Sophie Sohoraye.

On his journey, the young prince came across a raven with drooping wings.

— Caw, caw! Give me food, and one day I’ll help you in return.

The prince did not think this raven could be of any use to him, but he decided to share a piece of bread with it. They ate together, and the prince went on his way.

A little further on, he saw a salmon wriggling on the bank of a river.

— Put me back in the river please, and one day I’ll help you.

The prince did not think that he’d ever need help from a fish, but it cost him nothing to put it back in the water. The Prince once again went on his way.

A little further along he encountered a wolf that was so skinny, you could practically see the sun shine right through him!

— Give me your horse to eat, I haven’t had a bite in two years.
— Alas no, wolf; I have helped a raven and a salmon, but I need my horse to go find my six brothers. Goodbye!
— Please! I swear, I can be very useful to help you find your brothers.

The prince hesitated for a long while. He finally relented and gave his horse to the wolf. After eating it, the wolf grew into a huge, strong beast with shaggy fur. He said:

— Get on my back. I’ll take you to your brothers.

The prince got on the wolf’s back, and they rode like the wind. They came to a high, steep mountain. The wolf stopped in front of a pile of stones.

— These are your brothers and the princesses. The troll turned them to stone. To get into his cave, you must climb up the mountain. In the cave, there is a princess. You must do what she says.
— No, I don’t want to go. I’m afraid.
— Don’t be afraid, go and do what she says.

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB, Nicola Ferro’s class, Group 571, inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh. Adam Arsenault-Ouellette, Olivia Arseneault, Nina Beerlandt, Tom Beha-Fortin, Zack Bériault-Blais, Édouard Brisson, Alexandre Cadoux, Adam El Yassini, Maria Filippenok, Clarisse Geneviève, Mahée Giroux, Boris Huang, Colin Jeria, Federica Lalonde, Nolan Larin, Khéo Le Minh Hung, Loraine Léveillé Castro, Arnaud Lord, Antoine Morissette, Harris Manuel Kafui Panou, Tyah Elnathan Randriamifidy, Tryfan Roberts, Angelle Schmitt, Camille Vignola

The prince climbed the mountain. When he reached the top, he entered the cave. And then he had a big surprise, as he saw the princess, whose beauty was breathtaking. She pushed him so hard, he almost fell out of the cave:

— What are you doing here? Go away. The troll will kill you!
— I must save my brothers. I will fight the troll if I have to.

But he realized that he didn’t even have a sword.

— Are you mad? asked the princess. The troll is indestructible, as he does not keep his heart with him.

At that moment, the earth shook.

— He’s coming. Hide under the bed. I’ll see what I can do.

The prince hid under the bed just as the troll entered.

— Ugh! It smells like... like... like human! said the troll.
— You think so? A magpie flew over the chimney and dropped a human bone onto the hearth. I threw it away as far as I could, but the smell remained. You have such a fine sense of smell, dear troll.
— Is that so? Oh well.

After the meal, the princess asked the troll:

— Dear troll, where do you hide your heart? I wouldn’t want to break it unintentionally.
— My heart? It is well hidden. It is… buried under the threshold to the cave.

And then everyone fell asleep. The next morning, the troll went into the forest as he did every day. The prince and princess dug under the threshold both inside and outside the cave, but they did not find the troll’s heart.

— He lied to us, said the prince.
— Wait, I’ll coax it out of him another way, said the princess.

She placed flowers on the threshold. At the end of the day, the troll came back to the cave.

— Ugh! It smells like... like... like human! said the troll.
— Do you think? A magpie flew over the chimney and dropped a human bone onto the hearth. I threw it away as far as I could, but the smell remained. You have such a fine sense of smell, dear troll.
— Is that so? Oh well.

After the meal, the troll asked:

— Why are there flowers on the threshold?
— Dear troll, it’s because your heart is there and I wanted to add a touch of beauty to that spot.
— My heart? But my heart is not there, my girl. It is well hidden. It’s... in the wardrobe.

And then everyone fell asleep. The next morning, the troll went into the forest as he did every day. The prince and princess rummaged through the wardrobe. At the top, underneath, inside and out... But they could not find the troll’s heart.

— He lied to us, said the prince.
— Wait, I’ll coax it out of him some other way.

She placed flowers on the wardrobe. At the end of the day, the troll came back to the cave.

— Ugh! It smells like... like... like human! said the troll.
— Do you think? A magpie flew over the chimney and dropped a human bone onto the hearth. I threw it away as far as I could, but the smell remained. You have such a fine sense of smell, dear troll.
— Is that so? Oh well.

After eating, the troll asked:

— Why are there flowers on the wardrobe?
— Dear troll, it’s because your heart is there and I wanted to add a touch of beauty to the spot where it is hidden.
— My heart? But my heart is not there, my girl. It is well hidden. It is far, far, far, far away. There is a lake: in the lake there is an island, on the island there is a church, in the church there is a well, in the well there is a duck, in the duck there is an egg. My heart is there.

And then everyone fell asleep. The next day, the troll went into the forest. Immediately the prince got out from under the bed. Just before exiting the cave, he said:

— I will return… I hope!

Chanoine-Joseph-Théorêt Elementary School - CSSMB, Annie Thibodeau’s class, Group 601, inspired by the tale The Troll With No Heart in His Body by Nadine Walsh. Adrian Leonel Alvarez Carmona, Kiana Aubert, Vincent Bélanger, Sara Jade Boudreau, Mehdi Boukezzi, Zoé Brouillette, Océane Chartrand-Daoust, Frédérique Demers, Samuel Diaz Aguiar, Laurie Gravel-Larouche, Meriame-Narjess Hammadi, Maolie Lacombre, Mya Languedoc-Du Temple, Lelabelle Lauzon, Zoé Letrouit, Xin Qi Li, William Limonges-Pleau, Nika Moreau, Clément Rochereau, Louan Roy-Lalonde, Élie, Roy-monga, Socheata Sean, Mafalda Veillette.

And the prince ran down the mountain. The wolf was waiting for him at the bottom, its snout on its front legs. The prince told him everything that had happened in the cave. The wolf stood up, stretched, gave a great shake and motioned for the prince to get on his back.

The wolf ran even faster without stopping until they reached a lake. The wolf swam to the island. But around the church was an iron fence, and the key hung from the church tower. The wolf could not help the prince get the key. The prince thought of the raven he had fed.

The raven came immediately, retrieved the key, and dropped it into the hands of the prince, who opened the door. In the church was a well. The prince leaned over the well-head and saw a duck. He bent over even more and grasped the duck with his fingertips. But then he heard a splash. The egg had fallen into the water! He then thought of the salmon. The salmon arrived right away, dove down deep, and retrieved the egg for the prince. The wolf said:

— Squeeze the egg.

The prince squeezed the egg. In the distance, they heard:

— AHHHH!

The wolf said:

— Squeeze again.
— AHHHHH! What do you want?

The wolf howled:

— Bring back to life the six knights, six princesses, and twelve horses you turned to stone in front of your cave!

The troll said:

— Yes, it is done. Now put the egg back!

The wolf said to the prince:

— Break the egg.

And the prince broke the egg. Everyone then heard an explosion, which was followed by a torrent of wind that bent the bell tower and an earthquake that roiled the ground.

The prince mounted the wolf again, and they went back to the troll’s cave, where they found the twelve horses with his six brothers and their princesses. The prince greeted them quickly before rushing into the cave where the princess was waiting for him:

— Let’s go; it stinks of troll in here!

They all went home to the king. Everyone got married, and there was such a big party that they say the guests are still eating to this day!

Perce-Neige Elementary School - CSSMB, Karen McNeil’s class, Group 501, inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley. Farida Dbelhalim, Aayush Bhagat, Imrane Boutkhill, Damarri Colin, José Ésahi Delcid-Cruz, Nihal El Alami, Hailie Cassandra Estanislao, Félic Feng, Othniel Ettien Koua, Brayan Ange Kuache, Francesca Njiba Mbiye, Tasnime Meddah, Lilya Medelci-Djezzar, Sabeesan Paramalingam, Madely Rocia, Samuels Cobian, Ibrahim Mohamed Shahul Hameed, Ghayathry Thevathas, Fédrick Hans Valbert, Jasmine Virk.

Perce-Neige Elementary School

Inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley

Karen McNeil’s class
Valérie Desautels’ class
Johanne Girard’s class
Johanne Gagnon’s class
Discover the tale

The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair

By Paul Mystère Bradley

Perce-Neige Elementary School - CSSMB, Karen McNeil’s class, Group 501, inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley. Farida Dbelhalim, Aayush Bhagat, Imrane Boutkhill, Damarri Colin, José Ésahi Delcid-Cruz, Nihal El Alami, Hailie Cassandra Estanislao, Félic Feng, Othniel Ettien Koua, Brayan Ange Kuache, Francesca Njiba Mbiye, Tasnime Meddah, Lilya Medelci-Djezzar, Sabeesan Paramalingam, Madely Rocia, Samuels Cobian, Ibrahim Mohamed Shahul Hameed, Ghayathry Thevathas, Fédrick Hans Valbert, Jasmine Virk.

According to an old French proverb:

Sorrow brings the morning spider,
worry brings the midday spider,
while hope brings the evening spider!

Watch the video

This girl is named Mauve, as she has purple hair. Her hair isn’t dyed; she was just born that way!

We don’t see her around town much because she’s always in her top-secret laboratory in the basement of her parents’ house. I don’t know if I can tell you about it because it’s still very hush-hush...

She’s always in her top-secret laboratory because the passion of this girl with natural purple hair is to build all kinds of robots.

She has one that brings her glasses of water and one that sharpens her pencils.

Her robots are always made from small, simple things, except for her most precious and most complicated robot: a robot that can make other robots!

This robot’s name is ©opie.

Perce-Neige Elementary School - CSSMB, Valérie Desautels’ class, Group 502, inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley. Homam Alatrash, Anne-Marie Blanchard Gagnon, Maria Bouhabila, Fiza Butt, Rayhan Choqi, Elias Choui, Nathan Koffi Ezane, Davina Mangala, Kathy Dabnishka, Karman Miah, Mane Mohamed Ahmed, Dushawn Noel, Laetitia Rosario Jean, Rami Saleem, Adrien Samuel, Eya Souissi, Krishnenthiran Theivendran, Andrei Valladolid, Meschac Zimbala

The story might have turned out differently if Mauve didn’t have an older brother. He would come to her laboratory every day and move things around, which annoyed her to no end!

As her big brother had no hair, we will call him “Baldy.” But what was really particular about this big brother is that he was afraid of everything, especially spiders.

One day, the big brother said to his sister:

— You’re so good at making robots. Could you make me one that hunts spiders?
— Easily, his sister replied. But would that robot be useful? I only make useful robots in my lab.

Her brother said that this robot would be very useful for him. Spiders are useless; the only thing they do is scare him. One time he saw a big, hairy spider in the backyard of their house between the swings and the edge of the forest. Since she was moving toward the house, Baldy couldn’t use the swings. He was sure that she wanted to gobble him up!

(Which is strange; for as my mother says, small bugs don’t eat big bugs!)

The purple-haired girl’s older brother insisted:

— Come on, make me a spider-hunting robot!

His sister refused. Anyway, she said, she had to go out to find new parts for more robots. Of course, it was Thursday! Every Thursday, Mauve would take a big bag and go rummaging through the recycling bins! Mauve’s robots were made of used parts, as her laboratory was 100% eco-friendly—which was great because reusing is even better than recycling!

While Mauve was away, Baldy took the opportunity to enter her top-secret lab and ask ©opie to make him a spider-hunting robot.

(At this point in the story, ©opie did not yet have a password...)

So ©opie started making a spider-hunting robot that looked like a giant spider.

Then the robot started up!

— We’ll call him Spider Kill! shouted Mauve’s big brother.

And the spider-hunting robot went off to find his prey.

In the courtyard, panic spread amongst the spiders.

The peaceful little daddy longlegs ran fast to warn the big-bottomed spiders, who in turn warned the Queen Spider, who was the biggest spider of all. In fact, she was the big, hairy spider who scared Mauve’s big brother. The spiders scattered from the backyard to hide in the neighbour’s shed.

The Spider Kill robot went about sucking up the cobwebs in the yard by weaving them together. Once the backyard was cleared of the webs, he made rounds to keep a lookout for the critters he was meant to hunt. Mauve’s big brother was so happy, he broke out into a song and dance.

Perce-Neige Elementary School - CSSMB, Johanne Girard’s class, Group 506, inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley. Eva Amboise, Kazeem Amer, Kaliyah Anthony, Michaela Ebanks, Yumen Elfara, Isaac Esan, Amadou Koné, Johanna Murielle Andréa Kone, Mohamed Lebiad, Victory Mbosso, Yasmine Mostefaoui, Joseph Ndala Mbaya, Moillet Sarah Marie N’dri, David Rondeau Del Vecchio, Yasser Salah Hethini Sethurajah, Mienmo Ursula Traore, Naman-Singh Vegal, Komba Seth Kabangu.

As Baldy sang and danced, a cloud of mosquitoes began to gather in the sky and started attacking in squads. There were no more spider webs to stop them!

Baldy got stung everywhere, especially on his head! He ran into the house, convinced that the mosquitoes wanted to gouge his eyes out! After getting bitten all over, he went to the bathroom mirror and put cream all over his puffy skin. Since the bathroom door was open, Mauve burst in. However, she didn’t suspect a thing; in fact, she was happy and just wanted to show her brother her bag full of new parts to make lots of new robots. That gave Baldy an idea.

That evening, Baldy went to the library and opened the secret door. Since Mauve always went to bed early, she was not in her lab. Her big brother took the opportunity to ask ©opie to build him a robot to chase away the mosquitoes. (At this point in the story, ©opie still did not have a password...)

©opie told him that the robot would have to be able to fly. This feature was complicated and would take more time. Baldy said he would help, but instead spent the rest of the night playing video games.

Meanwhile, in the neighbour’s shed, a unique and extraordinary meeting was taking place. All the animals had gathered at the request of the fat and hairy Queen Spider.

The King Mosquito arrived first. He was easy to spot, as he was the smallest. Small, medium and large birds came too, along with the ninja squirrels. Yes, you heard right! The Beaver family and even the Fox all agreed to attack Spider Kill.

However, the strongest Big Black Bear in the forest did not come. (Whenever you talked to him, he simply looked up to the sky while eating honeycomb. So everyone just let him be!)

The other animals from the forest gathered in the backyard. They waited for the signal. When Spider Kill made his way to the sand box, the King Mosquito, who was watching the house, gave the signal to all the mosquitoes!

The ninja squirrels came out of their hiding place and threw ninja stars, or Shuriken, carved out of nuts.

As Spider Kill put up his hands in defence, the Fox knocked him down onto his back. Daddy Beaver, who was ready for the manoeuvre, pushed a dead tree over onto the robot. But Spider Kill, who had absorbed all the spider webs in the yard, threw up a net that deflected the tree toward the fox, who ran away.

That’s when all the spiders made their move. Before Spider Kill had time to turn around, his legs were tied up. The spider-hunting robot was captured.

Perce-Neige Elementary School - CSSMB, Johanne Gagnon’s class, Group 601, Inspired by the tale The Robots of Mauve, the Girl with Purple Hair by Paul Mystère Bradley. Arielle Anzara, Catalina Cabeza, Anthony Cordeiro, Clavens Donaston, Elijah Estanislao, Adam Goudet Shengh, Jaihden Graham, Janet Joshua, Dianne Losloso, Yossra Malki, Safeer Mansoor, Salma Marwane, Will-Fred Merceron, Mouhamed Ndiaye, Farrow Paul, Sheran Ravinthiran, Ajai Virk.

But Mauve’s big brother, Baldy, never went to bed and saw the whole thing while going to get a snack.

— My robot, they’re attacking my robot! We need reinforcements!

Baldy rushed to the lab and saw the most beautiful robot ever! A super-sophisticated robot that was fast and had multifaceted, lemon-yellow eyes. Since it looked like a dragonfly with two pairs of wings, Baldy called it “Double ZL.”

©opie explained that the robot wasn’t done. He needed to make adjustments to ensure everything was working properly.

Baldy was in too much of a hurry; he started up the robot without thinking about the consequences and sent it off to hunt the mosquitoes. The mosquitoes formed a wall of stingers that Double ZL narrowly avoided. Instead of returning to attack the mosquitoes, the robot went directly for the Queen Bee. Obviously his settings were not correct, as Double ZL ended up going after the bees!

Two lightning-fast hummingbirds tried to stop him, but he outpaced them. The Blue Jay and the Cardinal tried to grab him, but Double ZL zipped between their legs. The Owl was not fast enough and had to stop to catch its breath. The Woodpecker distracted Double ZL to give the bees time to escape.

(If the Black Bear had been there he could have caught the robot, but he would get his comeuppance in the following weeks when the bees disappeared from the forest. Bee numbers are dwindling more and more in the country and even in the world. Fewer bees means less honey—even for bears. How sad!)

The purple-haired girl arrived at the end of the skirmish. She had a robot interpreter who translated everything the animals told her. She was angry with her brother but did not get discouraged. She turned the spider-hunting robot into a flower-planting robot, which would eventually help the bee population recover over time.

Do you know what happened next? Well, Mauve programmed ©opie with a top-secret password so that her big brother couldn’t do any more damage. When their parents came back from vacation and heard about her big brother’s misdeeds, they said he would have to go without dessert for 270 days.

Then, well, his parents sent me here to tell you this story!

And every word from this tale, Every sting, thrust and holler, Is truer than true, roboticist’s honour!

Add a touch of culture to your inbox
Subscribe to the Museum newsletter

Bourgie Hall Newsletter sign up

This website uses cookies in order to optimize your browsing experience and for promotional purposes. To learn more, please see our policy on the protection of personal Iinformation