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Currently shown

Capital, possibly of a Pilaster

Location

EGYPT, probably ANTINOPOLIS

Era

Roman Period (30 B.C.E.-395 C.E.)

Title

Capital, possibly of a Pilaster

Date

4th c. C.E.

Materials

Limestone

Dimensions

33.6 x 59.8 x 30.5 cm

Credits

Purchase, Horsley and Annie Townsend Bequest, inv. 1959.B.2

Collection

Archeology and World Cultures

Egyptian architecture in the early centuries of the Common Era was marked by a wealth of decoration combining geometric and figurative elements. This capital is adorned by depictions of the Egyptian landscape and its fauna, more specifically lions and antelopes in acanthus greenery. Typical of the style at the time, the decorative elements stand out clearly against the background, but the surface remains relatively flat. Also of note is a certain stylization of forms, particularly in respect to the lions’ manes. The capital was acquired at the same time as two other sculpted architectural fragments that, unlike this piece, seem to have been reworked in the twentieth century in the style of a collection of fakes dubbed the “Sheikh Ibada group.”

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